World War II: For Liberty: A World War II soldier's inspiring life story of courage, sacrifice, survival and resilience

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What price did our World War II veterans pay for Liberty?

“For Liberty” is a World War II veteran’s inspiring life story of courage, sacrifice, survival and resilience

Find out just what Ed experienced on the front lines.

What was the war like in France and in Germany.

Find out how he survived the cruelties of Stalag 4-B, suppessedly the Nazis "model" prisoner of war camp and how he starved for months gooing from 165 pounds to a mere 90 pounds eating sawdust bread.

Ed was a Jewish-American soldier who served in the 399th Infantry Regiment of the 100th Division in Europe during World War 2. The mission of the Division was:To Cease and To Hold lands occupied by the enemy.

From the end of 1944 through 1945, the division fought valiantly to repel the Germans from France.

Ed recalls the battle in the trenches, hand to hand combat that involved knifing the enemy, throwing molotov cocktails at enemy tanks and more horrors of war during the 164 days of relentless combat.

The 100th division suffered over 12,215 casualties and hundreds of soldiers reported as missing in action were actually taken prisoner by the Nazis in Germany and mistreated as were all of the holocaust victims. Some, like Ed, miraculously survived. They forced Ed and hundreds of prisoners into overcrowded rail cars and locked them in for 7 days without food and water. They could only stand chest to chest. Ed survived but the time in the crowded box car damaged a leg. However, many perished before arriving at the camp. This happened twice as he was transported to another prisoner of war camp. During his imprisonment, Ed lost over 75 pounds in just 4 months eating bread made from saw dust. When he was released he had starved down 165 to just 90 pounds. In desperation he had tried and failed to escape twice, risking being shot by the guards, such was the suffering he endured as he slowly starved. Death would have been certain, had he not been finally released in April of 1945

Keywords:

Resilience

Resilient

Unbroken

Undaunted

Brave

Forward Observer in WWII

World War II veteran’s stories

World War II battle stories

World War II soldier’s stories

Holocaust

Jewish soldier world war 2

Concentration camps

Prisoner of war camps

Battle of Bitche

Sons of Bitche

Battle at the Vosges Mountains

Liberation

D Day