Thriller: Meth Moon: To Hell & Back: A Native American story about meth and how it destroys lives (The Birds of Concho Trilogy) (Volume 2)

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Meth Moon: To Hell and Back

Methamphetamine destroys families, and the soul of a culture that struggles to take care of its children. In Apache County, Arizona, where Concho is a tiny enclave of extraordinary beauty and American history of Mexicans and American Indians, the town in, “Meth Moon: To Hell and Back,” is compromised with drugs. Meth labs grow in places where the drug can be produced easily. These situations are supported by the beauty of this world turned inside out. Ironically, a dark, moonless night can provide the secret environment the meth user, manufacturer, and distributor needs. “Meth Moon: To Hell and Back,” tells the story of how two childhood friends become men and are on different sides of the law.

 While the friends, Johnny and Frankman define their lives by either living with or without drugs, a coyote, Dirt-Between-the-Paws, enters their lives. The language of nature and what is just versus what the evil drug world can do to good people, is spoken from the world of the coyote. The mother of all coyote’s, Dirt-Between-the-Paws, speaks. She quietly leads and she forgives. Similar to the children who are born of meth addicted mothers, Dirt-Between-the-Paws is an innocent bystander who gives us life lessons.

“Meth Moon: To Hell and Back,” takes us on a journey of beauty and treachery. It reminds us to protect children who are at minimal entitled to come into the world healthy. When a mother uses drugs and compromises the growing baby inside her, she should be held accountable. As of this writing, Tennessee is the only state in America that will prosecute the mother when the child is born mentally or physically challenged because she used drugs. In April, 2014, according to, Counsel and Heal News, “The state's governor, Bill Haslam (R), signed a bill into law making Tennessee the first in the country to arrest and incarcerate pregnant women who use drugs during their pregnancy that negatively affect the fetus.”  Currently, Arizona has no laws to protect its unborn children from the impact of drug use while in utero.

 
  --Kareena Maxwell, 2015

Manufacturer Description

Meth Moon: To Hell and Back Methamphetamine destroys families, and the soul of a culture that struggles to take care of its children. In Apache County, Arizona, where Concho is a tiny enclave of extraordinary beauty and American history of Mexicans and American Indians, the town in, “Meth Moon: To Hell and Back,” is compromised with drugs. Meth labs grow in places where the drug can be produced easily. These situations are supported by the beauty of this world turned inside out. Ironically, a dark, moonless night can provide the secret environment the meth user, manufacturer, and distributor needs. “Meth Moon: To Hell and Back,” tells the story of how two childhood friends become men and are on different sides of the law. While the friends, Johnny and Frankman define their lives by either living with or without drugs, a coyote, Dirt-Between-the-Paws, enters their lives. The language of nature and what is just versus what the evil drug world can do to good people, is spoken from the world of the coyote. The mother of all coyote’s, Dirt-Between-the-Paws, speaks. She quietly leads and she forgives. Similar to the children who are born of meth addicted mothers, Dirt-Between-the-Paws is an innocent bystander who gives us life lessons. “Meth Moon: To Hell and Back,” takes us on a journey of beauty and treachery. It reminds us to protect children who are at minimal entitled to come into the world healthy. When a mother uses drugs and compromises the growing baby inside her, she should be held accountable. As of this writing, Tennessee is the only state in America that will prosecute the mother when the child is born mentally or physically challenged because she used drugs. In April, 2014, according to, Counsel and Heal News, “The state's governor, Bill Haslam (R), signed a bill into law making Tennessee the first in the country to arrest and incarcerate pregnant women who use drugs during their pregnancy that negatively affect the fetus.” Currently, Arizona has no laws to protect its unborn children -Kareena Maxwell

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Biography

Kareena Maxwell lived in NYC for 36-years. She studied Media Communications at Hunter College in NYC returning to study music when she was 28. She sang in local clubs in her earlier life but quickly changed to writing after her first writing class at HC. She was a wholistic health reporter in the early 1980's for Health & Diet Times newspaper. She has published poetry, short stories, travel memoirs, and 8 books. Her writing reflects changes and explorations in human consciousness. Currently, she is working on 3 writing projects: She loves to write; is excited about life through writing. After reading Gone With the Wind when she was 11-years-old she knew that she would eventually write novels. "I see story lines and hear people talk about everyday things and always know that there is a plot there," she says.  The trilogy, "The Birds of Concho," Threshold Publishing, 2018, is available on Amazon, and Barnes & Noble on line and in their Flagstaff, Arizona store. Maxwell's current writing projects include "India Burning: 12 Days in Manipur," a 2018 release date is expected. Her memoir about being a caretaker for her mother who has dementia, "The Granny Chronicles: Learning to Speak Leopard," is on Kindle and can be purchased on Amazon.com. Also on Amazon is a collection of her short stories and essays, "The God of My Shoes." She has won ten awards for her literary work.